8 responses to “Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus”

  1. Souren

    Walt Whitman, Daniel, no?

  2. Earline Ahonima

    Walt Whitman, yes!

  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Oh blimey, how did I mess that one up? The (even more) embarrassing part is I was rereading “Leaves of Grass” just a few weeks ago. Somehow I’ve made that wrong association in my mind for a long time, and not even rereading the poem helped.

  4. jodi DeLong

    Could have been worse, Daniel, you might have credited Ray Bradbury instead (see his collection of short stories, I Sing the Body Electric!) Lovely stories, and no slight meant to Bradbury, but Whitman he ain’t…. 🙂

  5. Colleen

    I love the common name ‘electrified cat tail moss’. It’s definitely a propos.
    Colleen

  6. ngawangchodron

    I’m so happy to have a definitive identification of this moss! I’m sure that they are easy to discern for the bryologist, but not necessarily for the photographer.Thanks.

  7. Alexander Jablanczy

    There was recently a long and thorough and too honest biograpy of Walt Whiman probably on PBS but it could have been late night CBC or TVO.
    A very complete expose of his life and times including his interest in Civil War soldiers. He really did love everyone not just in his poems.
    He was quite a showman and a selfpromoter at which he was obviously successful as he must be the most famous US poet. In this he was similar to Whistler and numerous other American writers of what now is the last century. They discussed his relationship with Emerson and Thoreau who warned him to cut his explicit homoerotic imagery but he wouldnt. His Leaves of Grass kept getting rewritten expanded with each of numerous editions. I must have been naive as a youth just as when I read the Picture of Dorian Gray I completely missed what the infamous crime was as I had no clue of the sexual proclivities of Wilde or Whitman. I thought the words they wrote were just Victorian sentiment not to be taken literally. They were.
    So now one could reread the whole of Leaves of Grass with an altered spin.
    The mystic poet the lover of all nature of all life and of all men.

  8. Alexander Jablanczy

    This exuberant and formless moss would actually be the perfect visual analogue of Walt Whitmans free verse, formless endless shapeless phyllorhoea like logorrhoea.

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