15 responses to “Acca sellowiana”

  1. Maire Smith

    “edible fruit, which is purported to taste like a combination of pineapple and strawberry or pineapple and guava. I haven’t sampled it, but it’s on my list of things to try.”
    I can’t say I agree about the pinepple or strawberry flavours. It just tastes to me like a much, much *better* guava.

  2. Beverley

    Acca sellowiana – Z8 – RHS Index of Garden Plants, Griffiths
    Acca sellowiana – Z8-10 – A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants, Brickell, Cole, Zuk

  3. Petra

    you can eat the petals which have a soft velvety texture and a sweet taste

  4. Ron B

    Grows in Seattle and easily found in nurseries at present, but I have never seen fruits here.

  5. Lorinda

    The fruit is quite common here in New Zealand, people describe as perfumey. It is an acquired taste!

  6. Eric in SF

    Interesting – this can be found as a street tree here in SF (although not as common as Callistemon or Metrosideros) – if I ever see fruit that’s not covered in black road grime I’ll give it a taste! =)

  7. Jared Tempe, Az

    I have tasted the fruit here in Phoenix kind of bitter and not much meat but, I am sure else where the fruit is much larger. Nice pic.

  8. Vanderley Benedetti

    No sul do Brasil é conhecida como “goiaba gaúcha”. O fruto pode ser visto em Feijoa

  9. Daniel Mosquin

    Thanks Vanderley. If I interpret what you wrote correctly, you said that Feijoa is known as goiaba in the south of Brazil – and to see the fruit, click on the link.

  10. lucia moura

    It’s a wonderful phto, i will post en my blog: http://arboretto.blogspot.com/
    You are welcome.

  11. Russell Frost

    Fruit deserves to be known as having a perfumed and sumptuous flavour all of its own. Fruit is best eaten once fallen (end of April/May in NZ – southern hemisphere). On smooth and thin skinned cultivars, skin can be eaten. A slow growing long-lived tree – a must have in your garden – makes a great hedge too

  12. Dave Vandegrift

    South America produces a host of fruits which are relatively unknown north of the Panama Canal. Perhap someday Andreas can provide a photo of guanabana, which I have eaten, but never seen as a flower or plant. The plant life of S.A. is one of the richest and most mysterious resources of the world—all the more reason to conserve it now.

  13. Dave Vandegrift

    South America produces a host of fruits which are relatively unknown north of the Panama Canal. Perhap someday Andreas can provide a photo of guanabana, which I have eaten, but never seen as a flower or plant. The plant life of S.A. is one of the richest and most mysterious resources of the world—all the more reason to conserve it now.

  14. Vanderley Benedetti

    The guanabana (Annona muricata) receives, in Brazil, the name of graviola. This fruit, native to the Caribbean, is the family of Annonaceae, which also belongs to the custard apple (here, fruta-do-conde). These delicious fruits have a sweet taste, somewhat sour, and are very rich in nutrients, and presents many therapeutic characteristics.
    The fruit of graviola can be viewed at http://lh5.ggpht.com/_XIBEFXP3obU/Rpa-rp9g5TI/AAAAAAAADKY/tk_akfVpols/s640/GRAVIOLA.jpg e em http://lh3.ggpht.com/_gZXpXkdH4jw/SrvNedbaOSI/AAAAAAAAEks/u3Z4sumdbAc/s640/DSC00763.JPG
    And the flower: http://i.olhares.com/data/big/95/957851.jpg
    Fruta-do-conde: http://websmed.portoalegre.rs.gov.br/escolas/montecristo/09cienc10/C14/nicole/frutaconde.jpg
    Fruta-do-conde flower: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3436/3375765208_bfa4fc911f.jpg

  15. shouhy

    A wonderful picture and useful website

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