9 responses to “Hedychium ‘Tara’”

  1. Tom Wood

    The cultivar ‘Tara’ originated from seed collected by Tony Schilling (ex Kew plant collector) near Kathmandu, Nepal (in The Plantsman 4: pg129 (1982)) and described and sold under H. gardnerianum ‘Tara’ in England. However, it is more properly identified as H. speciosum var. gardnerianum ‘Tara’. It differs from H. coccineum in that it has fragrant flowers with a flat labellum and also often has two flowers open in the same bract while H. coccineum has non-fragrant flowers, an infundibuliform labellum and ony has one flower open in each bract.

  2. David Constantine

    ‘Tara’ is and has always been sold in the U.K. as H. coccineum ‘Tara’.

  3. paul

    i introduced H coccineum by seed from Darjeeling years ago.
    It has proved very invasive or vigorously naturalizing depending on perspective.
    I have 100 – 200 self sown clumps flowering. One is EXACTLY like Tara.

  4. Mike

    Hi,
    Where I can get Hedychium coccineum ‘Tara’ in Canada?

  5. Ethel Miyashiro

    I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR THIS ORANGE GINGER ROOTED PLANT FOR AGES. MY SIS IN LAW JUST FOUND YOU. I WOULD LOVE TO HAVE THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF GROWER AND WOULD LIKE TO PURCHASE A PLANT.
    SINCERELY,
    ETHEL MIYASHIRO OF MONTEREY PARK, CA 91755

  6. Brock

    I bought this ginger from Hawaiian Botanicals in Richmond, BC. They have a website.
    Love this plant!

  7. Steve

    Plants that are vegetatively propagated from the original introduction are fragrant and a good orange as shown in the picture. But it has been much distributed now from seed-sown stock which is variable. If you have a butterfly ginger that you purchased as ‘Tara’ but is salmon-colored or not fragrant, you probably have a seed-grown plant. The fact that a seed-sown grex can produce nonfragrant individuals as well as those with lighter-colored flowers supports the theory that ‘Tara’ might be a hybrid between T. gardnerianum and T. coccineum.

  8. Celso Lago-Paiva

    Both species are probably involved: the tepalae, mainly labellum, are of H. coccineum, but colours of tepalae and of the stamens resemble those of H. gardnerianum.
    Both species are invasive in Brazilian forests, but H. coccineum does not set seeds, produced freely by H. gardnerianum, which loves high ranges.
    Worst as invasive in Brazil are H. flavescens, and H. coronarium, fertile and too prolific.
    Hybridization may gat worse the problem of invasions in natural habitats, mainly in wetlands, and in rainforests.
    Celso Lago-Paiva
    Instituto Pró-Endêmicas
    Minas Gerais, Brazil
    instituto_proendemicas@hotmail.com

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