6 responses to “Galeopsis speciosa”

  1. Pat Collins

    Nice to see the photographer has left the bindweed in place rather than clean up the composition. I once found it as an urban weed in central Manchester, unexpectedly beautiful.

    The Wikipedia article uses Plants for a Future ( http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Galeopsis+speciosa ) as a reference which in turn quotes their reference as (74), the numbers being collated on one reference page ( http://www.pfaf.org/user/cmspage.aspx?pageid=174 ). This brings us to the index and thence to vol. XXI (in the 1977 English translation) of the “Flora of the USSR” published in Russian in 1954. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/95140#page/114/mode/1up
    **************************************************************
    Economic importance. The seeds of G.speciosa (like those of other Galeopsis
    species) were used until recently for extraction of oil that had technical applications
    (production of drying oil, polish for boots and harness). Experiments have been made
    to use the oil for food. It has been found to be tasty, but its consumption causes temporary
    paralysis of limbs, especially when the organism is heated by work. A similar effect is produced when Galeopsis seeds occur in large amount in cake fed to livestock. The most effective control measure is to prevent the shedding of mature seed by careful weeding of the crops and, in some places, by mowing. Mowing should be done at the onset of flowering of hempnettle and as close to the ground as possible.
    **************************************************************

  2. Souren

    Looks like a bit of bindweed along with? It gets everywhere that stuff!

  3. MB Whitcomb

    Looks like a pansy (Viola) in the genetic woodpile!

  4. Jessica

    Hmmmmm….”tasty, but, its consumption causes temporary paralysis”. Maybe not such a good idea for us plant foragers! I guess I’ll stick with Lamb’s Quarters. LOL

    It’s certainly a beautiful plant, though.

  5. Thomas Duzha

    Science is beauty expressed as prose,
    while beauty is science expressed as poetry.

  6. Nadia

    very often we pass by small beautiful flowers like this without noticing them:((

Leave a Reply