8 responses to “Erythranthe lewisii and Erythranthe cardinalis”

  1. Sara Mauritz

    When did Erythranthe supplant Mimulus? Even http://www.theplantlist.org is still accepting Mimulus. Just curious.

    1. Mark Darrach

      A genetics paper published in 2002 by Beardsly & Olmstead in Amer. Jour. of Botany found Mimulus to be very polyphyletic: “Mimulus is not monophyletic, because members of at least six other genera have been derived from within it”. That is reason why, and it is a well-reasoned argument.

  2. Linda McMahan

    Thanks so much for starting the postings again. This post and all the others make a beatific start to my day!

  3. MB Whitcomb

    Looks a lot like Rehmannia elata. 🙂

  4. Christine

    When did these Mimulus species become Erythranthe and is this a new coinage? The name doesn’t appear in my, admittedly out-of-date, RHS Plant Finder.

    (Since the word comes from two Greek words meaning “red” and “flower”, I guess Erythranthe cardinalis is now a red red flower?)

    1. Mark Darrach

      A genetics paper published in 2002 by Beardsly & Olmstead in Amer. Jour. of Botany found Mimulus to be very polyphyletic: “Mimulus is not monophyletic, because members of at least six other genera have been derived from within it”. That is reason why, and it is a well-reasoned argument.

  5. Wendy

    I find it fascinating all the different and clever means employed by plants to avoid self pollination. I remember a nature show which described the lack of involvement of tiger males in family life. When a father by chance meets his offspring he is as likely to kill his son as to copulate with his daughter. I wonder why plants have so many mechanisms in place and mammals do not seem so protected. Plants really do rule!

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