Calytrix tetragona

Thank you to Bill Higham@Flickr, of Hobart, Tasmania, for sharing today’s image with us (original). Not only is Bill a skilled photographer, but he’s also a poet and writer; you can read some of his work at his website: The Cut Monkey. Much appreciated!

Over seventy species of Calytrix are recognized. All are endemic to Australia. Calytrix tetragona, or common fringe-myrtle, is widely distributed through southern and eastern Australia. It is a shrubby species reaching about 2m (6 ft.) in height at maturity. Flowering is typically in Australia’s spring, though it can flower throughout the year, which seems to be the instance in this case as it appears Bill photographed this individual in March.

Variation in flower colour (ranging to pink) and calyx colour (maturing to a deep-red) can occur, as documented on the site of the Australian Native Plant Society: Calytrix tetragona.

Calytrix tetragona

7 responses to “Calytrix tetragona”

  1. Meg

    Wonderful web link. The Cut Monkey is a beautiful site. Thanks for sharing it.

  2. Douglas Justice

    Fantastic calyx awns!

  3. elizabeth a airhart

    thank you for showing us this pretty flowering plant
    the links and pictures on the aussie native plant society
    are just fine-nice to know ti’s not in danger in the wild
    thank you daniel and company

  4. quin

    lovely simplicity! should be more widely cultivated. thank you

  5. Emily Schiller

    What a gorgeous photo! The lighting and the detail are so beautiful. Can you tell me what the rust colored strands that lace themselves through the flowers are called? They appear to be extensions of the sepals.

  6. Diane G.

    Emily,
    As per Douglas Justice’s comment above, I believe those are calyx awns. Not a term I could have come up with by myself! But knowing those two terms, and putting two & two together… 🙂
    Now if only I can remember it.

  7. Bill Higham

    thankyou all – I am glad you enjoyed the photo and the website and thankyou Daniel for your kind words – cheers – Bill Higham

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