8 responses to “Scaevola taccada”

  1. Doug

    Another picture of the fruit (same species?):
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/55257385@N00/1514573859/in/set-72157603460441911/
    Cultivated on the grounds of the Westin hotel in Freeport, Grand Bahama Island.
    The flowers:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/55257385@N00/1515429430/in/set-72157603460441911/
    Is it Scaevola taccada?

  2. Carol Ross

    There is a beautiful dark purple variety of fan flower sold around here in PA which is labeled as scaevola. It has a very much more delicate foliage than in your picture, and is popular in mixed container plantings with petunias, geraniums, and the like. Is it a man made variety? I didn’t see any pictures of it on the links.
    Carol

  3. Patrick Knoblauch

    The leaves of Beach Scaevola are used by Hawaiians to prevent fogging of snorkel and scuba masks. Two or three leaves are crushed by hand and rubbed on the inside of the glass, preventing fogging for hours. Far more effective than the commercial preparations and free as well.

  4. Alex

    Oh, nice picture on the Scaveola taccada. Recently I visited Redang Island in Malaysia and I saw some of these plants!

  5. elizabeth a airhart

    i live in florida and agree this is
    a handsome plant -but invasive quite so
    the pictures are great and the write up
    good weekend to you all

  6. Floridian

    Terribly Invasive Exotic plant in Florida. Please don’t plant this if you live in here in the sunshine state. For info about this plant naturalizing in Fla. go to: https://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/scaevola-taccada/

  7. franz

    what is the chemical compound?

  8. Lita

    thank you for your information.It really helps my assignment in Agricultural Science

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