7 responses to “Pinus roxburghii”

  1. Susan Nielsen

    OK… If you had to take the photos from inside the car, how did you get your 5 rupees back? 😉

  2. Michael F

    Nice pic!
    Grammatical point: the species is named after Roxburgh (i.e., in his honour) not for him (i.e., at his request).

  3. Beverley

    Pinus roxburghii – Z9 – RHS Index of Garden Plants, Griffiths
    Pinus roxburghii – only suitable for the milder areas [of the British Isles]. Hillier Manual of Trees and Shrubs, 2003

  4. Denis

    Michael:
    There are 34 entries under “for” in my dictionary (which is somewhat dated), one of which is “on behalf of”, which gets the point across. Regardless, your comment strikes me as pedantic and only distracts from the enjoyment of the photo. I think you or someone of similar mindset has made other like comments on Botany Photo of the Day. Although I have no desire to discount the importance of good grammar, the point you make is so obscure as to be meaningless. Would it be possible to just try to enjoy the photo and not engage in unnecessary criticism?

  5. Alex Jablanczy

    I agree the critique of for was wrong, his English is shaky even if its his only language.
    Lets try something else the Queen Charlotte Islands were named FOR Queen Charlotte or Sandwich Isles FOR
    Lord Sandwich not the food he invented.
    This is good usage and does not mean that either the
    Lord or the Queen had anything to do with it.
    Or say Copernicus Crater on the Moon after one Nicholas Copernicus.
    For after both are correct.
    The Islands now lost those names to political correctness being Hawaii and
    Haida Gwaii anyway.
    Fuchsia is named after for on behalf of in honour of and not by Fuchs.

  6. Jenn

    Michael F –
    I’m glad for the head’s up on correct grammar. Clean and clear writing is a skill that not all fully appreciate.
    “For after both?”

  7. George T

    Believe it or not, we have one of these trees growing in our yard here in South Texas. We purchased it many years ago at Fanick’s Nursery in San Antonio. Their original mother plant was damaged by an unusually cold freeze about 25 years ago and the top of the tree was killed. I think they have removed the tree now because of its unsightly appearance. Our tree is in bloom now, and I can send pictures if you would like. Just let me know. Right now, the only pictures I have are of the trunk, which is much larger than the one shown here, and it has an ivy vine growing on it.

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