9 responses to “Pinus monticola”

  1. van

    Gorgeous photograph. The lighting is sublime.

  2. Ruth

    Stunning photo, Daniel.

  3. TC

    Looks good enough to eat. Fine shot.

  4. Ron B

    Might’ve been somebody commenting on the felling of ancient Sierra redwoods to make small wooden objects like toothpicks (these trees tend to shatter when hitting the ground).

  5. Eric in SF

    Is there any significance to pine cones that point up versus those that point down?

  6. Old Ari

    As I remeber the story, the Blister rust was imported on a bunch of White Pine seedlings from Europe.

  7. Michael F

    “Is there any significance to pine cones that point up versus those that point down?” – they point up in their first year, then as they grow larger in their second year they hang down.
    “… a foreign fungal pathogen introduced into North America from Europe (though originating in Asia)” – equally, the European white pines (P. cembra, P. peuce) are very resistant to WPBR, so the fungus may well be native in Europe too, rather than just Asia.

  8. Douglas Justice

    Eric, I can’t think of a pine with cones that point up–at least once they’re open. And I can’t think of an adaptive advantage for a cone that spreads its scales to expose its seeds to the weather, but then, that makes me wonder why Larix species would do exactly that.

  9. Bruce V.

    Daniel:
    The white pine is the reason Diamond Match was such a big part of northern Idaho society.
    Best Wishes

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