9 responses to “Maianthemum dilatatum”

  1. Marjorie Jarrett

    I always wish that I had a better name than ‘false…’ something or other for such an attractive plant but I don’t think I like snakeberry much better. anyway – lovely landscaping job by mother nature and great photos, especially the one on the right.

  2. Ginny Remeika

    Amazing to see this Maianthemum growing up the tree trunk. Our native (here in Maine) M. canadense is often called “Canada Mayflower”, and is very nice but not nearly so spectacular, nor does it ever grow up tree trunks. Cullina says M. dilatatum is hardy to Zone 4, so I will search for some. Many thanks!

  3. TC

    Hmmm, “a desirable shady-spot groundcover,” especially of the “proliferatively branching rhizomous” species of plants often becomes an undesirable and unwanted invasive.

  4. Ron B

    >I always wish that I had a better name than ‘false…’ something or other for such an attractive plant but I don’t think I like snakeberry much better

    Wild Lily-of-the-Valley
    Beadruby
    Deerberry
    May Lily
    Oregon Colt’s-foot

  5. Meg Bernstein

    I love the way it’s growing up the tree trunk. Mother Nature is an amazing landscaper as the other viewer said.

  6. Dianne Huling

    I’m replying to Ginny’s comment below:
    “Our native (here in Maine) M. canadense is often called “Canada Mayflower”, and is very nice but not nearly so spectacular, nor does it ever grow up tree trunks.”
    We have Maianthemum canadense var. canadense (syn. M. canadense) as a native plant in Rhode Island. It does crawl up tree trunks. I have a lovely picture of it doing so. It is also extraordinarilly invasive, carpeting large areas of the forest floor. I would characterize it as an undesirable shady-spot groundcover. Other native Maianthemum species, for example: M. racemosum, M. stellatum and M. trifolium have been moved to the Smilacina genus. M. dilatatum looks to be more attractive yet invasive also. Perhaps Ginny you will rue the day you found a source for M. dilatatum.
    Dianne

  7. elizabeth a airhart

    thank you daniel this will be
    a book mark page
    so much life dwells in this space
    i put my zoom up to 200 and am in awe
    ferns growing on the trunk of the tree
    little red insects or perhaps snails?
    some kind of red blooms on the right
    all manner of plants on the floor of
    the forest i love the shape of the leaves
    so much to see and enjoy–thank you

  8. Beverley

    Maianthemum, ma-an-the-mum; from Gr. Maia, the mother of Mercury [Gr. mythology], to whom the month of May was dedicated, and anthemon , a flower. Plant Names Simplified, Johnson and Smith.

  9. Anthony

    I always enjoy your visits to Botanical Beach.

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