Botany Photo of the Day
In science, beauty. In beauty, science. Daily.

February 16, 2016: Botany Photo of the Day will return this spring with a new format similar to the new UBC Botanical Garden web site. In the meantime, please enjoy the restored content!

Acer circinatum

Acer circinatum

Acer circinatum, second of a three-part series on this plant. The first can be seen here. The last of the series will include a written piece about the whys and hows of autumn leaf colours.

Botany / conservation resource link: H. Bruce Rinker's article entitled, “The Weight of a Petal: The Value of Botanical Gardens”. An excellent (but brief) article summarizing the benefits of research and conservation gardens, such as UBC.

5 Comments

Acer circinatum is native to N America, B.C. to California. Z5. Source - RHS Dictionary Index of Garden Plants - Griffiths

just wondering...is that moss in the branches?
or halloween ghost?

phillip

Hello, Phillip. It's neither a moss nor a Halloween ghost – it's a lichen, probably something from the genus Usnea.

Daniel, what an absolutely glorious photo! Thanks for linking to the two-years-prior BPoD pictures. I look at the one- and two-year photos each day, as well as enjoying the current day's treat.

Like other species, autumn dress can vary wildly between individuals. Some are amazing, others are terrible. Several I once had planted out front were always lousy, as are others planted in Camano Island garden - although now fairly large I thinking of suggesting we remove them, as they have been a source of annoyance for some years.

Buying in fall color would be a good plan with this one, something that is true generally with deciduous trees and shrubs raised from seeds and planted for fall color.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

 
UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research
6804 SW Marine Drive, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z4
Tel: 604.822.3928
Fax: 604.822.2016 Email: garden.info@ubc.ca

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia